Elements of historiographical metafiction in Margaret Atwood’s ‘’the blind assassin’ and Martin Amis’ ‘’Time’s arrow’’: A comparative literary analysis

  • Dr Tapash Rudra Lincoln University College
Keywords: online book review publisher, research papers publisher, High impact factor journal, UGC approved journal, Dr Tapash Rudra, Elements of historiographical metafiction in Margaret Atwood’s ‘’the blind assassin’ and Martin Amis’ ‘’Time’s arrow’’: A comparative literary analysis

Abstract

Historiography is the study of history as a discipline. This evaluates the methodological and epistemological aspects during the course of history or historical manifestations of a specific era. However, the past could not be proclaimed only by means of a simple narrative. In reality, the metafiction illustrates the way of reconstructing and rewriting the historical incidents. It virtually uncovers the various facets of a historical era as it not only confines itself within the dry historical facts, rather it rejuvenates the monumental events that took place and how they eventually affected the memoir of the personal belief and emotion of the people. In this work, I chose two completely different novels as far as their historical background is concerned, however, gender discrimination at the social hierarchy and classism have always been existing, both during peace and crisis, as I intricate and compare the flow of both the novels. I tried to analyze both the novels with utter importance from the historiographical point of view so as to propel them into metafictional elements and make sure how they could be brought into public perspective. Moreover, I went in depth of the theoretical aspect of both the novels and emphasized on literary techniques that have been employed to manifest how these novels are extremely adequate to portray ‘’historiographical metafiction’’.

Keywords: Historiography, Metafiction, Post-modernism, Memoir, Holocaust

Author Biography

Dr Tapash Rudra, Lincoln University College

Dr Tapash Rudra, PhD in Biotechnology, is an Associate Professor, Dept. of Biotechnology and Post Graduate Coordinator for Faculty of Science, with Lincoln University College, Malaysia. He has served as a lecturer with many institutions and is a widely published author.

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Published
2019-02-05
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Research Papers